Some reasons humbly offered for laying a duty upon wrought silks
Read Online
Share

Some reasons humbly offered for laying a duty upon wrought silks by Charles Boit

  • 497 Want to read
  • ·
  • 78 Currently reading

Published in [London? .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

SeriesEighteenth century -- reel 2171, no. 3.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination1 sheet
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17056977M

Download Some reasons humbly offered for laying a duty upon wrought silks

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

Some reasons humbly offered for laying a duty upon wrought silks [Ressource électronique] / Boit, Charles Date: Editeur / Publisher: [Farmington Hills, Mich]: Cengage Gale, Book Microform: Microfilm: Master microform: EnglishView all editions and formats: Rating: (not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first. Subjects: Boit, Charles. -- Some reasons humbly offered for laying a duty upon wrought silks. Silk -- Taxation -- Great Britain -- Early works to Silk -- Taxation. View all subjects; More like this. Some reasons humbly offered for laying a duty upon wrought silks by: Boit, Charles. Published: () A proclamation, imposing a further custom upon wines and tobacco, &c. Some reasons humbly offered for laying a duty upon wrought silks by: Boit, Charles. Published: () A Case humbly offer'd to the honourable House of Commons, on behalf of the packers, &c., concerned in the woollen manufacture, in relation to buckrams and barras Published: ().

Reasons most humbly offer'd against prohibiting foreign silks mixt with gold and silver Published: () Reasons humbly offer'd by the Hambrough merchants, and other traders and dealers in the woollen manufacture of Great Britain, against the intended duties on several sorts of German linnen Published: (). Some reasons humbly offer'd to the consideration of both houses of Parliament shewing, the necessity for making a law this present sessions of Parliament, to oblige all foreign plain black silks to be imported at the port of London, to be there seal'd and mark'd, after the duties laid thereon shall be paid ; and for obliging all plain black silks manufactured here to be mark'd or seal'd before. Journal, November November 3. Present:—Sir Charles Cooke, Mr. Docminique. Trade. Silk weavers, Canterbury. Representation. Mr. Philip Manneke, of the Company of Silk Weavers at Canterbury, attending with Mr. John Carter, Mr. Bennet Metcalf and Mr. John Gregory, factors in London for the said Weavers of Canterbury, they presented to the Board a representation from the Master, . Reasons humbly offered against laying the new projected duty on English wrought silks plainly proving that it will be injurious to trade, vexatious to Her Majesty's subjects, and impracticable to be levied. Published: ().

Full text of "Manual of Unitarian Belief" See other formats This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project to make the world's books discoverable online. I stand assured, if you will forgive her, she will repent her of all past offences, and return unto her duty." The strength of the parson's arms had at first been of more service than the strength of his rhetoric. However, his last words wrought some effect, and the squire answered, "I'll forgee her if she wull ha un.   A LETTER FROM CAPTAIN GULLIVER TO HIS COUSIN SYMPSON. Written in the Year I hope you will be ready to own publicly, whenever you shall be called to it, that by your great and frequent urgency you prevailed on me to publish a very loose and uncorrect account of my travels, with directions to hire some young gentleman of either university to put them in order, and correct the . THE WHITE DOE OF RYLSTONE William Wordsworth wrote this poem following a visit to Bolton Priory in It is based upon a legendary account concerning the local Norton family. Francis Norton, the youngest member of the house of Norton in the late 16th century, took a young milk-white doe from the moors near their home, and gave to his sister Emily.